Recruitment and HR Blog

Introducing Biz Bulldog - Central Coast Business Ambassador

Matt Heighway - Monday, July 02, 2018

Biz Bulldog

Central Coast Business Ambassador

 


 

Name: Business (Biz) Bulldog

Job: Small Business Owner, Central Coast Business Ambassador, Business Critic

Business Interests: Value, efficiency, quality service

Hobbies: Dressing well, visiting local coffee shops and eateries, hiking

After many years running successful businesses on the Central Coast NSW, Biz Bulldog has taken on the newly created role of Central Coast Business Ambassador. This role will see Biz Bulldog search for products, services and processes that add value and help grow Central Coast Businesses.

As a business owner, Biz Bulldog encountered the same issues and problems that we all do as business owners from poor service from suppliers, products that just don’t do what they promise, issues with staff and problems with cashflow. He is one of us. Always an advocate for growth in technology and “doing thing betters and faster”, Biz Bulldog is passionate about business and after many years finding solutions to everyday business problems will now seek out value for business on the Central Coast.

Now retired, Biz Bulldog will be busy travelling the Central Coast, talking to business owners and strenuously testing their products and services to find the very best options and opportunities that will give Central Coast the advantage. Biz has identified The Footprint Group's new pay as you go recruitment as just one of those opportunities. When asked to comment Biz Bulldog replied "As ambassador for Central Coast Business I have bee searching for value, I have found it, Pay as you go recruitment". 

Keep an eye out for Biz Bulldog as he works his way around the Central Coast.

For more information on Biz Bulldog please email his Agent at matt@thefootprintgroup.com.au or visit his own page here

Finding Employees that will represent your Brand

Matt Heighway - Monday, May 07, 2018

Footprint Recruitment Central Coast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As business owners, leaders and managers we often spend a great deal of time and effort into our ‘brand’. This includes our business brand, our personal brand and often in a wider capacity the brand of our industry and local business community.

We put countless hours and huge amounts of money into building our brand, ensuring the image is right, the consistency is there and the marketability of the brand is as strong as it can be. We know our brand, and many of those leaders who really have a strong understanding of, and synergy with their brand, represent their brand in everything they do.

They act in a way which reflects the brand, talk in language which speaks of the brand, dress in a way which reflects the brand and communicate in ways which suits the brand and its consumers.

So the brand is good, and we know how to represent it – but then there are the staff. How can you make sure that the people you engage in your business represent the brand as well as you do?

The people you engage in your organisation, whether as employee, supplier or contractor naturally become associated with your brand, and one thing I believe we can’t underestimate is the value of association and the impact this has on our brand.

You can work as hard as you like perfecting your reflection of your brand, but if the associations you keep in your business do not appear consistent with the brand you are trying to portray, you are undermining and possibly damaging the quality, consistency and overall impact of your brand by those who view your business.

At the heart of this for me is the people within your business. The staff, contractors and service partners you align yourself with who, by nature of their roles, act as an ambassador to your business and ultimately are responsible for projecting your brand to your consumers and the wider community.

Whether employed by you directly or indirectly via an agreement, engagement or supplier relationship, you need to be certain that they represent your brand to the extent you expect and the level you demand.

To do this here are some tips to help get things aligned:

-Understand for yourself the values, beliefs, attitudes and behaviours which define your brand. By understanding this you can then ensure all future relationships align with these core values, and as such reflect your brand.

-Assess new employees with these values in mind, to ensure they reflect the brand from the inside out, so to speak

-Think about your brand when you engage a contractor or supplier, and ask yourself this question “if my top customers knew this person / business was associated with me and my business, how would they feel?”

-Trust your gut and follow your instincts

Associating yourself and your business with the right partners can be a valuable addition and compliment to your brand, and conversely the reverse can apply.

Never underestimate the value of association and the impact that those representing your business, whether directly employed or not, can have on your brand image and reputation in the market place.

The right fit - How to recruit staff in a candidate short market

Matt Heighway - Tuesday, April 03, 2018

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When your business is short staffed, there can be nothing more frustrating than a candidate short market.

You and your team are already under the pump, and as an owner or manager you constantly find yourself being pulled into working ‘in’ rather than ‘on’ your business. This only impacts on your ability to focus on growth, client acquisition and product & service development.

But despite the temptation, it’s important to remember that desperate times shouldn’t mean you take desperate measures.

When you simply don’t have the resources to make ends meet, and fulfil the workload you have coming through the door, it can seem like a good option to appoint new employees who don’t fit in with your usual criteria and are a mis-match with your culture and values. But this in fact can do more harm than good and here is why:

1)A new team member who does not encompass your values and work in a way which reflects your business quality standards, ethics and systems will never be long term, so ultimately you spend time, money and effort training, developing, coaching and guiding for them only to leave before you have recouped your costs

2)Appointing a new team member who does not fit in with your existing team, who are committed to your vision and goals, will potentially upset them and have the reverse impact for you. To unsettle your existing team may result in less productive staff, or worse still those staff leaving the organisation because of the new person

3)In a candidate short market your judgement can be blurred by desperation. You need extra hands on deck ASAP, and the candidates in these markets know this. So they become more demanding with their expectations around terms, conditions and salaries. Ultimately you agree because you need someone, but long term it creates a situation with is no longer sustainable because the business workflow ends up structured around them and their demands, rather than the potential for a strong structure for growth.

Clearly there needs to be a solution to help get you and your business through this time, so here are a few things I recommend to help relieve the load!

1)Communicate openly with your existing team and support them – create an environment which keeps them engaged, motivated and focused. This way they will be as productive as possible for you. Share with them your efforts to locate a like minded team member, and even ask for their help with this, you never know who is around in their extended social circles.

2)Think outside the square. Clearly your usual ideal candidate is not out there right now, so how else could this work get done? Can the work be re structured in the office to create a different skills gap, can you promote or retrain an existing team member, can you systemise or streamline anything to help make processes easier and faster?

3)Think about outsourcing. This won’t be an option for all roles and all businesses, and certainly may not be long term. But in the short term could a contractor or outsourced supplier help you to get through this busy period?

4)What’s not urgent and taking up your time? Can it be put on the shelf for a short time? This can often be hard for business leaders who spend time and energy structuring things to enable them to spend time on their business and its overall strategy and development. But sometimes, especially in small business, the ability to switch between working in and on the business can be priceless for getting through these tough workflow periods

5)Get an outsider’s perspective. Ever felt like you can’t see the forest for the trees? It can happen so easily when you are snowed under, overwhelmed and unable to see a real solution. Getting an outside consultant, mentor or trusted advisor in to have a ‘birds eye’ look at your business might reveal some light bulb suggestions for easing the load, which had been in front of your face the whole time but just hadn’t crossed your mind. 

Above all else it’s important to remain positive and focused. Be clear about your vision and direction and the sort of people you want in your business to help you achieve these goals. If you remain clear on that, it will help ensure that even in the times you feel like you’re drowning in work, you make the right decisions about who you engage in your business and why.

 

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